Waah Tera Kya Kehna  
Producer: Sibte Hasan Risvi
Director: Manoj Aggarwal
Starring: Govinda, Raveena Tandon, Preeti Jhangiani, Shakti Kapoor, Shammi Kapoor, Kader Khan, Ashish Vidhyarhthi and Monish Behl
Music: Jatin-Lalit
Lyrics: Sameer

Genre: Comedy
Recommended Audience: General
Released on: November 01, 2002
Reviewed by: Suraj Das
Reviewer's Rating: 1.5 out of 10


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Govinda was once a top star in the Indian film industry. He used to bring freshness and energy to his comic roles and audiences kept coming back for more. Heroines used to sign as many films with him as possible in hopes of scoring a hit film and dance number (after countless chartbusters like "Akhiyon Se Goli Mare," "What Is Mobile Number," "Makhna," "Kisi Disco Mein Jaye," etc.). He regularly used to star along side big names like Amitabh Bachchan, Anil Kapoor, and Karisma Kapoor among others.

Today, Govinda´s career is a mess. Top actors, producers, and directors avoid him like the plague. His backlog of films is huge because no distributor wants to touch his repetitive, stale, delayed comedies. Besides struggling upstart actresses trying to get a foothold in the industry, only close friends like Raveena Tandon and Rani Mukherjee are willing to star in a film as his heroines. His films launch with zero anticipation and have dismal runs at the box office.

Where did Govinda go wrong? Easy - by repeatedly starring in low budget, tacky films with recycled storylines, clichéd situations, and repetitive slapstick routines. Films that offer absolutely nothing new or fresh for audiences. Films like Manoj Agarwal and New World Enterprises´ Waah! Tera Kya Kehna.

This latest "comedy" begins with a car accident that leaves Raj Oberoi (Govinda), grandson of multi-millionaire Krishna Oberoi (Shammi Kapoor), with severe brain damage. His ailment is such that he reverts back to the mindset of a five-year old child.

Krishna Oberoi is unfazed by this and still thinks Raj is a worthy heir.  But his other family members beg to differ. The classic Govinda villain troupe (Shakti Kapoor and Monish Behl in roles they have done all through their careers) become hell bent on keeping Krishna Oberoi´s money all for themselves. So they send Raj off to Shimla where he is greeted by an avalanche and they bump off Krishna.

So the hero dies and the film ends on a tragic note a la Devdas, right?  Unfortunately, audiences have no such luck. Enter Banne Khan (Govinda) who looks exactly like the deceased Raj. A suave con-man who wants Krishna´s estate and wealth all for himself, he squares off against the rest of the Oberoi clan in a battle of wits (or is it half-wits) for the property.

But wait; there is also the obligatory romance angle. Raj had a girlfriend played by Preeti Jhangiani and Banne has a deranged girlfriend played by Raveena Tandon. So there is a love triangle of sorts brewing as well when Banne arrives and pretends to be Raj.

If you can´t tell from the storyline, the film is horrible. The nonsensical plot moves at a snail´s pace and is routinely interrupted by useless, off-track comedy sketches that have nothing to do with the "plot." The first half is incredibly vague and un-involving relying mostly on stale jokes and juvenile slapstick humor. The second half kicks off with the "I Want Money" number that Govinda has sung himself. The song with its silly lyrics and interesting dance moves is actually the only bright spot in this otherwise dull film. But alas, the momentum doesn´t last. The film picks up a little speed only to get bogged down in more unneeded comedy sketches, hackneyed action scenes, and tedious song picturizations.

By the time the film is over, audiences are alienated, lost, and all but entertained. The story twists and turns and adds and subtracts characters as it pleases. It has no direction, but it still rambles on for what seems like an eternity. It´s a long, painful, spiral downward that leads to absolutely nothing. In case you´re still wondering, there is nothing to laugh about here.

Govinda´s performance does precious little to make the film worth watching.  His bit as Raj Oberoi is basically a mix of Chotte Miyan from Bade Miya Chotte Miyan and Bunoo from Deewana Mastana with a hint of the mute Sunder from Pyar Diwana Hota Hai. As Banne Khan he just repeats the same role he has done in countless films by now including Jodi No. 1 and Joru Ka Ghulam.  His acting and dialogue delivery are uninspiring and routine. The freshness and zest he used to bring to these roles is long dead. It´s high time that Govinda realizes that while his comic histrionics may have been funny when they first appeared they certainly cannot entertain after five years of repetition. The actresses don´t do much, but are fairly functional in their roles.  Preeti Jhangiani dons the role of the traditional heroine with relative ease. She goes through the motions with charm, but has no scope to impress. Raveena Tandon is wasted in a repetitive, loud, and over-the-top performance that seldom entertains and more frequently grates on audiences´ nerves.

Shammi Kapoor does not impress and fails to impose the charm that veteran thespians of his age and stature should at this point in their careers. His appearance is lackluster. Kader Khan is dull. Shakti Kapoor and Monish Behl are pathetic.

Manoj Agarwal´s direction is dismal. He has reached a new low in after the not so great Pardesi Babu and the boring Hadh Kar Di Apne. Technically, the film looks tacky. Production values are very poor and the look of the film is just as lame and stale as the humor in the film. Dialogs are dry.  Jatin-Lalit´s music, besides the Govinda sung track, should rank amongst the absolute worst released this year. There seems to have been no effort from the editing department.

There is absolutely no good reason to watch Govinda´s Waah! Tera Kya Kehna.  The film has no humor, bad performances, and bad music. Those looking for a good comedy should looks elsewhere (might I recommend the funniest film of the year - Jaani Dushman?) As for Govinda, it´s prime time he realized that his career is dying. He desperately needs to put his immense talent to use in a strong role in a worthwhile film -unless he intends to become the true laughing stock of the industry.