Planet Bollywood
Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak
 
Producer: Nazir Hussain
Director: Mansoor Khan
Starring: Aamir Khan, Juhi Chawla, Alok Nath
Music: Anand-Milind
Lyrics: Majrooh Sultanpuri
Singers: Udit Narayan, Alka Yagnik
Audio On: T-Series    Number of Songs: 7
Reviewed by: Rakesh Budhu  - Rating: 8.0 / 10
 
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Anand-Milind were never the awe-inspiring music directors. Their soundtracks often contained one or two numbers, which drove audience’s wild and others mostly, which were complete time pass. Their talent was more than often displayed in those one or two tracks, which struck the listener immediately. This at most evident in Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak. Surely, Nazir Hussain knew what good music was in his long career of Bollywood musicals and Mansoor Khan too never lost emphasis of the power of music, but at most it was the few numbers that made soundtracks strike gold, Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak has that and in some sense a little more. The soundtrack also followed a trend having only two singers in its entirety, in which two, but the excellent Udit Narayan and Alka Yagnik.

The beauties of this soundtrack came in the form of “Ae Mere Humsafar” and “Papa Kehte Hain”. The young vocals of Udit Narayan and Alka Yagnik perfectly enhanced the light dholak base in the evergreen “Ae Mere Humsafar”. The refrains of “Manzil pyaar ke” are at the very least touching and exhibit a talent to compose hit romantic songs that many of the eighties styled music composers displayed. Anand-Milind also do a lot with very less, just using the guitar, the dholak and the excellent singing duo of Udit and Alka they have created one of Bollywood’s most memorable duets.

Papa Kehte Hain”, in its original and sad version is a stage song that many have tried to re-create today. It completely belongs to Udit for which Anand-Milind just support with excellent guitar use. The song is immensely catchy and ultimately became a winner after the film scored.

Akele Hai to Kya Gum Hain” is a more regular song, which benefits with meaningful lyrics courtesy Sameer and a bit of experimentation from Anand-Milind. The song still ends up a bit slow and is made more to help the proceedings in the film.

Keeping the slow theme going is “Gazab Ka Hai Din”, a song that has Alka making promises to Udit. The song changes its mainstream tunes frequently to prevent it from becoming too slow, something that is evidently possible.

If Udit Narayan has his solo in “Papa Kehte Hain”, then Alka must have hers in "Kaha Sataye”, which starts off with Alka in classical form to proceed to nothing more but a two minute vocal exercise for Alka. Pretty short, but sweet nonetheless.

The Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak theme ends off the T-Series soundtrack and it’s a great way to do so. The theme almost very different than the other tunes starts off with classical beats to switch gears into eighties styled musical orchestration. While instrumentals may not be everyone’s cup of tea, this one serves its purpose with a number of experiments in it.

Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak was certainly not the best musical in terms of soundtracks, but was definitely a good soundtrack with “Ae Mere Humsafar” alone.

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