Planet Bollywood
Hair Is Falling
 
Producer: Urmila Sharma, Gudduji
Director: Vicky Bhardwaj
Starring: Rajesh Bhardwaj, Sanjana, Priyanka, Manoj Pahwa
Music: Arpan-Sumit, Kamran Ahmed
Lyrics: Rishi, Sandy, Varun Garg, Kamran Ahmed
Singers: Rishi, Kalyani Shakarwar, Shaan, Neeraj, Kamran Ahmed
Audio On: U Tunes    Number of Songs: 6
Album Released on: 25 March 2011
Reviewed by: Atta Khan  - Rating: 5.5 / 10
 
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About 3 years ago to this day Pritam released a soundtrack for Mukesh Bhatt’s Jannat and music lovers went crazy! Not surprisingly, it went on to become THE most listened-to-soundtrack of 2008 thanks to some mega rock anthems but none more so than the outstanding “Lambi Judai”. The song was an instant hit and went onto win countless awards. Thing is though, that wasn’t a Pritam song! In fact it was produced by the (then) debutant composer and song writer from Pakistan, Kamran Ahmed, who won MTV’s “Best Breakthrough Artist of the Year” award (2009) for his efforts. The question is, how on earth do you follow a smash hit debut like that?

Well 3 years later we find out albeit from a much smaller budget soundtrack for the upcoming film and oddly titled Hair is Falling. Suffice to say Kamran Ahmed’s sole contribution to this soundtrack is the stunning “Na Samajhna” (Track 4) which fans will recognise from his debut album (also called “Na Samajhna” and released in late 2010). To say that it overshadows the rest of the songs on the soundtrack is a huge understatement indeed but one listen and you will realise why…Trademark guitar strings are followed up by some haunting opening vocals by Kamran that light a small flame and before you know it the song blazes into life with the sound of thunderous drums that sound so delicious, you’d be forgiven for thinking they were pumped with steroids! Those peppy drums are the mainstay of the instrumentation along with an electric guitar and Kamran’s vocals that are just as good as you had hoped for, the well written song is powerfully and passionately evoked. Before you know it 6 minutes are over and you are madly jumping for the repeat button…again and again! The song is admittedly no match for “Lambi Judai” but if you were expecting something as good as that, then you’re asking for the impossible.

The rest of the music is composed by relatively unknown composers, Arpan – Sumit (with lyrics by Rishi, Sandy & Varun Garg), and they do a reasonable job although as previously stated, their work is overshadowed somewhat although their music is more relevant for the film. “Dilli Ke Deewane” (Track 1) sung by the youthful sounding Rishi and Kalyani Shakarwar is a cool and funky effort, the sort of song that will be enjoyed by the youth of today. “Buddhe” (Track 2) is an amusing situational song that should work well on screen. Singers include Shaan and Rishi and they are supported by a chorus of singers to bring this one to life. “Darta Hai Kyun” (Track 3) is another well composed effort sung by Neeraj but it’s short length suggests it’s another one for the film.

To finish the soundtrack, there are a couple of remixes thrown in for good measure, if you are interested in these you will find them at Tracks 5 and 6. One thing to point out here is a lack of a remix / alternative to Kamran Ahmed’s “Na Samajhna”. It’s a shame because if you recall Pritam experimented superbly with two alternative versions of “Lambi Judai”.

Well what more can you say about a soundtrack that is dominated by one song? Nothing! You just take your hat off and applaud the effort “Na Samajhna” by Kamran Ahmed. Incidentally, if you haven’t heard his debut album then that too comes highly recommended particularly if you enjoyed his efforts here, in fact it won’t be a surprise if further songs (from his album) are used in future Bollywood soundtracks, just watch this space!

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